Underbridge Pictures

www.underbridgepictures.com

CLINTON IRVING JONES

WINTER IN NEW YORK

AND

BROOKLYN IN 1900

NEVER BEFORE SEEN PHOTOGRAPHS, PRINTED FROM GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES BY THIS NEWLY REDISCOVERED ARTIST.

NEW YORK IN WINTER is the latest exhibition of photographs by Clinton Irving Jones at Underbridge Pictures. In addition to Jones' early 20th Century images of Dutch domestic and agricultural architecture, shown this fall in BROOKLYN IN 1900, he created a series of winter scenes in Prospect Park, Brooklyn after an ice storm in January 1909. See article on these images, cover of the New York Times City Section for December 31, 2006.

He also created a set of wonderful photographs in Mamaroneck, NY, where his wife's family lived.

Jones images attracted attention when the New York Times ran an article about him in the City Section on October 29, 2006.

Clinton Irving Jones was a photographer working in Brooklyn early in the 20th century, with a tremendous interest in architecture. He focused on remnants of an older Brooklyn which were fast disappearing as industrialization and urban residential development took over vast areas of farmland. Here are the farmhouses, barns and mills once common in the borough but rare by 1900, and all but nonexistent today. In addition he recorded scenes of the modern city, as well as beautiful views of Prospect Park, mostly in Winter. This record of a Brooklyn which is long gone is what makes the collection so important.

Little is known about Jones today. Most of the information we have comes from notes on his negative sleeves. These notes give us a glimpse into the photographer's thought process, as well as location information. The unusual double doors on the house shown below caused him to make this exposure.


We know that he used a 4x5 camera loaded with glass plate negatives. Quite a commitment at a time when roll film cameras were readily available. .

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A set of his negatives appeared at an auction in Syracuse, New York. They were later offered on ebay, and were purchased there, by the present owner.


Searches of Brooklyn records reveal that Jones married Ella Agneta Knapp on July 9, 1901. His photograph of her in Prosect Park is included in the exhibition. He is listed as living with her in 1910, age 50, at 138 Steuben St. in Brooklyn. His occupation is listed as a secretary, working in a settlement house. Hopefully more personal information about Jones will surface.

His images are the real treasure, however. They give us a glimpse of the long gone world of

BROOKLYN IN 1900.

This exhibition is made possible, in part, by a grant from the Brooklyn Arts Council